Venue love and the challenges of going foam free

 
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Morning lovelies!

As you may have noticed Film and Foliage has gone 100% floral foam free and this week my little business faced our biggest challenge so far. Creating an epic entrance installation at the beautiful Woodhouse at Wollombi (my new favourite venue) in the heat of Australian summer (technically 2 days into Autumn) along with 2 floral features at the reception, a floral arbor and growing aisle flowers. Holy moly!

In the past I wouldn’t have thought twice about chucking some cable ties on 20 bricks of foam and poking in a million flowers, job done! But running a business isn’t all about putting your profit and convenience above the environment and I don’t feel comfortable expecting our Mother Earth to produce incredible flowers in return for non biodegradable plastic from me. (Each foam brick contains the equivalent to 12 plastic bags)

Designing with foam has taken a lot of creativity, planning and patience but the pay off is worth it and I am so lucky to be friends with some incredible innovative florists who are also on the foam free journey, helping me brainstorm ideas and come up with solutions.

Also, my Dad happens to know how to weld, which is incredibly handy when I need structures specifically designed for my weddings. My solution for the huge entrance install was hanging metal baskets with vases in them. Dad created these to hold either 2 or 4 of my glass cylinder vases and the plan was to hang these at different heights to create a water source for my flowers. Pro tip, using hardy foliage or dried textures are a great way to fill and cover mechanis while your fresh flowers and more delicate ingredients can enjoy the water source. This structure can be limiting with where you place your flowers, which can be frustrating. I used water vials to get around this and found that there is a beauty in restriction, it means you really need to work with your structure and flower stems instead of just having the freedom to place your flowers exactly where you want them. This design became a floating floral cloud with so much depth and a lightness to it.

Ash xx